The Association of Ontario Midwives

The Association of Ontario Midwives

Client Clinical Resources

Iron deficiency anemia and you

Iron deficiency anemia and you

When you have iron deficiency anemia, you don’t have enough iron to make hemoglobin, so your body starts to make smaller and fewer red blood cells. Less hemoglobin and fewer red blood cells also means your cells can’t get the oxygen they need. This document provides an overview of iron deficiency anemia causes, symptoms and treatment options.

Not What We Planned: Two stories of birth and postpartum hemorrhage

Not What We Planned: Two stories of birth and postpartum hemorrhage

This video is intended for midwifery clients who have suffered a postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). It provides factual, evidence-based information about postpartum hemorrhage and midwifery care in Ontario. Based on interviews with real midwifery clients, the video explores two families’ experiences with PPH.

Many midwifery clients who have experienced PPH report feeling isolated during the recovery period and wish they had a friend to talk to who had lived through a similar experience. If you have suffered a PPH and are feeling isolated, these stories may help you to feel a little less alone.

This project was funded by Women’s Xchange, a women’s health knowledge translation and exchange centre based at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto.

Watch the video. 

Life after postpartum hemorrhage: recovering from the unexpected

Life after postpartum hemorrhage: recovering from the unexpected

This document is a resource for families following the experience of a postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). It usually takes longer to feel “back to normal” after a PPH than after a birth where there was a usual amount of bleeding. This document can help guide you through the postpartum period after you have had a PPH and help you know what to expect as you recover.

This project was funded by Women’s Xchange, a women’s health knowledge translation and exchange centre based at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto. A french version is also available.

In Due Time: Pregnancy Beyond 40 and Induction of Labour

In Due Time: Pregnancy Beyond 40 and Induction of Labour

As it becomes more common for women 40 and over to give birth, midwives, family doctors and obstetricians have started asking questions about the needs of this group of women. This document focuses on induction of labour. It doesn’t address other decisions that midwifery clients who are 40 and over may face while pregnant. French and Spanish versions are also available.

What are Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy?

What are Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy?

Although most women will have normal blood pressure during pregnancy, about 10% of pregnant women will develop high blood pressure. Though most women with high blood pressure while pregnant or after giving birth will not experience any major problems, this handout is to help you understand the conditions and risks associated with high blood pressure as well as  recommendation for care. This client document is based on info from the AOM Clinical Practice Guideline No. 15: Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy, released in 2012. French and Spanish versions are also available. 

Thinking about VBAC: Deciding what’s right for me

Thinking about VBAC: Deciding what’s right for me

If you have had a caesarean section (c-section) before, your midwife will talk to you about your options for this pregnancy. This handout aims to help you think and talk about your decision with your midwife, your partner and family and friends. This client document is based on info from the AOM Clinical Practice Guideline No. 14: Vaginal Birth after Previous Low-Segment Caesarean Section released in 2011. A French version is also available.

When Your Pregnancy Goes Past Your Due Date

When Your Pregnancy Goes Past Your Due Date

Anywhere between 37 and 42 weeks is considered to be a normal term pregnancy. A pregnancy that lasts longer than 40 weeks may be called a postdates, postterm or prolonged pregnancy. This handout is to help you understand the risks and recommendations for an uncomplicated pregnancy that goes past 40 weeks. This client document is based on info from the AOM Clinical Practice Guideline No. 10: Management of the Uncomplicated Pregnancy Beyond 41+0 Weeks' Gestation, released in 2010. A French version is also available.